On College Campuses

I would like to think my college campus is unique in its own right with the homey location, diverse student body, party scene, interesting academic classes, and the many opportunities to get involved all over campus. However, when it comes to student groups and organizations it’s different. If other schools are like mine then every club is competing against one another and vying for the attention of potential members from newcomers and oldcomers alike.

With personal experience being in a student run culture club, not only are we trying to recruit enthusiastic individuals who share similar interests and will serve the club but we also work to host a variety of interesting events throughout the year. You would think that after the pandemonium of student fairs it would get easier right? Well, think again. Throughout the year numerous events are held and it’s not uncommon to have at least five events in one day. A student on campus has many choices to choose from. So how does one club stand out more than the others?

Doesn’t this sound familiar? Student organizations and groups remind me a lot like the consumer market these days. You could even say that like markets today, it’s overcrowded with too many choices and as Buying In’s author Walker addresses in his book as the ‘Pretty Good’ problem, the events put on by these various student clubs are pretty good in quality.

Yet, the way they are able to distinguish from each other is the onslaught of advertising that goes on around campus via Facebook, campus news publication, and the main method of all, flyers and posters. Just by walking around campus, one is exposed to the fliers that decorate the walls in academic buildings, dining halls, designated flier areas like the steps by our main library. The ones that get noticed go between the very unique and what people find recognizable.

Take these two fliers, one from the Japanese Culture club I’m apart of and one from UC Berkeley. What do these two have in common?

Answer is the use of iconic images or brands from TV shows and movies.

We are hardly aware of doing it but we use marketing used on us to market our own messages. In the case of my club’s flier, beyond Pikachu being of Japanese origin and the main character of a popular show amongst children and young adult fans, it has little to do with the club’s actual intentions, whi is bringing uncommon knowledge about the culture, practices, and history of Japan to the student body while UC Berkeley’s objective is to attract a crowd to discuss racial issues.

I’m sure like many school’s clubs out there, we do it because we know others will have an easier time associating to something they’ve seen before than to something that’s unfamiliar to them. It’s a habit that we’re all guilty of.

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